Insulating Your Garage Door

Garage Insulation With the hot summers and frigid winters commonly experienced in the Chicagoland area, insulating your garage is a great option for homeowners.

An insulated garage can help keep you cooler or warmer. It can also help to lower your energy costs! An un-insulated garage door can suck up a lot of the air conditioning and heat from your home, greatly increasing your energy costs. If you have rooms directly beside or above the garage door, you will also have to use more AC or heat to keep them at a livable temperature.

To familiarize yourself with insulation and the process, we will share information from Houselogic on the types of insulation and how to match the insulation to your garage door.

Types of Garage Installation

  • Batt insulation –  This flexible insulation, often found stuffed into exterior walls, is commonly made of fiberglass. It’s usually backed by paper or foil, which act as vapor and air barriers. Insulating values are R-3 to R-4 per inch of thickness.
  • Foam board insulation. These rigid panels, typically made from polystyrene, provide a high insulating value for relatively little thickness. Panels most often range from ½ inch thick (R-3.3) to 1 inch (R-6.5). Foam board often is faced with aluminum or vinyl.
  • Reflective insulation. Rigid boards and rolls of reflective insulation have highly reflective aluminum foil applied to one or both sides of insulation materials, such as cardboard and polyethylene bubbles. This type of insulation reflects radiant heat, making it a good insulation choice for garages that heat up in summer or hot climates. Its approximate R-value is 3.5 to 6, depending on the way you apply it.

Matching Insulation to Your Garage Door

The ultimate goal here is to choose an insulation that matches both your garage door and climate. Below are some considerations based on your garage door’s material: 

  • Steel garage doors –  These doors can accommodate any type of insulation. Stuff the flexible insulation in the frames around the panels, with the fiberglass side touching the door. Or squeeze cut-to-fit foam board insulation into the frames.
  • Wood frame-and-panel doors – Cut and fit rigid insulation into the recesses between the door frames. For extra climate control, install two layers of foam board.
  • Flat garage doors – Foam board or reflective insulation is the best fit for garage doors without panels. Glue or tape the insulation to the garage door.

You can read the full article here. And check out this article for a step-by-step process. Stay cool!

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